13548 Jarrettsville Pike | Phoenix, MD 21131 410.683.0650
  • facebook
  • twitter
  • google+
  • youtube
  • pinterest
  • rss

5 Things You Never Knew about Granite!

We know that granite has a rich history, but generally, we don’t know much else.

You aren’t going to get quizzed on any of this if you’re using granite in a masonry project, but it’s fun just to learn and appreciate the history of this natural stone. We narrowed down five interesting facts for all of you granite enthusiasts.

Granite Facts

You aren’t going to get quizzed on any of this if you’re using granite in a masonry project, but it’s fun just to learn and appreciate the history of this natural stone.

1. Granite’s Long History

Since granite is a natural stone, and it has been used as a building material for several centuries. Most people don’t realize that granite is an igneous rock, which means it was formed by volcanic activity.

2. Granite Cliffs

Did you know that granite forms some of the world’s tallest cliffs? The northwest face of the Great Trango Tower in Pakistan is made up of Baltoro Granite. There are also other huge granitic walls and peaks composed of granite, which include Mont Blanc massif, Alaska’s Ruth Gorge, the Bugaboos of Canada and the Fitzroy Paine.

3. The Color of Granite

The color of granite will largely depend on the type of feldspar it contains. Below is a list of the feldspars and what color it usually makes the granite appear.

– Plagioclase Feldspars- Milky White

– Alkali Feldspar- Brick Red, Emerald Green, Pale Yellow

– Pink Alkali Feldspars- Pink

– White-Colored Alkali Feldspar- Gray or White

4. Granites Across the Map

The granites of City of Rocks, Cochise Stronghold, Mount Lemmon and Little Cottonwood were all formed around the same time. It may be hard to imagine, but a particular episode caused oceanic plates to break apart. The plates breaking exposed the bottom of the North American continental plate, which caused new pockets of magma and bodies of granite. This happened about 30 million years ago!

5. Radioactive Granite

Granite contains small amounts of uranium, so it is considered to be radioactive. It depends on the type of granite, but some granite bodies can produce 5 to 20 times the normal amount of uranium. While we are rarely in danger, those in poor ventilated areas that are surrounded by soils coming from granite bedrock could be at risk.

With a rich history and a beautiful appearance, it’s easy to see why granite is used in so many masonry and construction projects.

Del Prete Masonry

For any questions regarding new masonry construction, feel free to contact Del Prete Masonry. Our masonry restoration professionals have the experience and history of satisfied clients to prove that we’ll get the job done right, and cost-effectively. To get started with your masonry restoration project, please contact our office today at 410-683-0650 or email us at mike@delpretemasonry.com. We serve Baltimore City, County, Harford County, Carroll County, Anne Arundel County, and Howard County. Keep up with our blog for masonry related information, and follow us on FacebookTwitter, and Google+.

Tags: ,

Comments are closed.